ICB Events and Archive

 
Institute of Catholic Bioethics - Annual Richard A. McCormic Lecture
When Wednesday, October 7, 2015
Speaker James Giordano PhD, MPhil, Chief, Neuroethics Studies Program Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics
Topic Neuroethics: Navigating - and Guiding - the Good, Bad, and Potentially "Ugly" Issues of Brain Science
Details

ABOUT THE LECTURE:

Progress in brain research is advancing at a rapid pace. Fueled by recent incentives, such as the newly announced Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnology (BRAIN) Initiative in the United States and Human Brain Project in the EU, the techniques and tools of brain science are being ever more employed in medicine, daily life, and even international relations and national defense agendas.

While such advances offer great promise to reduce the burden of neurological and psychiatric disorders, they also prompt concerns about how brain science could be misused, how new findings might affect social concepts of self, normality, and free will, and how the development and use of neuroscience can and should be guided and governed.

While such advances offer great promise to reduce the burden of neurological and psychiatric disorders, they also prompt concerns about how brain science could be misused, how new findings might affect social concepts of self, normality, and free will, and how the development and use of neuroscience can and should be guided and governed.

In this lecture, neuroscientist and neuroethicist Dr. James Giordano of Georgetown University Medical Center provides an overview of recent developments in the brain sciences; illustrates how such progress incurs potential benefits and burdens; and discusses how the field and practices of the relatively new discipline of neuroethics are poised to address and direct these powerful advances – and the provocative, if not controversial issues, questions , and solutions they foster - both at present and in the future.

James Giordano, PhD, MPhil is Chief of the Neuroethics Studies Program of the Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics, and Professor in the Department of Neurology; with co-appointments in the Division of Integrative Physiology of the Department of Biochemistry; and Graduate Liberal Studies Program at Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. He is William H. and Ruth Crane Schaefer Distinguished Visiting Professor of Neuroethics and Educational Neuroscience at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC, and is also Clark Faculty Fellow in Neurosciences and Ethics at the Human Sciences Center of the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität in Munich, Germany, where he was formerly 2011-2012 JW Fulbright Foundation Visiting Professor.

Dr. Giordano currently serves an appointed member of the Neuroethics, Legal and Social Issues (NELSI) Advisory Panel of the Defense Advanced Research Projects’ Agency (DARPA), engaging neuroethical aspects of advanced deep brain stimulation approaches developed within the Systems’ Based Neuroscience for Emerging Therapies (SUBNETS) program.

The author of over 200 publications in neuroscience and ethics, his books include Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives in Neuroethics (with Bert Gordijn; Cambridge University Press); Neurotechnology: Premises, Potential and Problems (CRC Press); Brain Injury: Spectrum Effects and Implications (with Patrick Waters; Potomac Press); Neurotechnology in National Security and Defense: Practical Considerations, Neuroethical Concerns (CRC Press); Maldynia: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Illness of Chronic Pain (Taylor-Francis/Informa), and Pain Medicine: Philosophy, Ethics and Policy (with Mark Boswell, Linton-Atlantic Books).

Dr. Giordano is an Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine; Associate Editor of Ethics, Biology, Engineering and Medicine, Executive-Editor-in-Chief of the book series Advances in Neurotechnology: Ethical, Legal and Social Issues (published by CRC Press), and Executive Co-Editor of the Brain Science, Philosophy and Ethics book series (published by Brill Press).

His ongoing research addresses the neurobiological bases of pain and other neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders; and neuroethical issues arising in and from the development, use and misuse of neuroscientific techniques and neurotechnologies in medicine, public life, and global health applications. In recognition of his work, he was awarded Germany’s Klaus Reichert Prize in Medicine and Philosophy (with longtime collaborator Dr. Roland Benedikter of the University of California at Santa Barbara); and was named National Distinguished Lecturer of both Sigma Xi, the national research honor society, and the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineering.

He received a BSc in physiological psychology (cum laude) from St. Peter’s College; MA in neuropsychology from Norwich University, VT; MPhil (in philosophy of psychology) and PhD (with distinction) in biopsychology from the City University of New York, NY. He was NIEHS post-doctoral fellow in neuropathology and neurotoxicology at the Johns Hopkins University, MD; APA Fellow in neuroimaging at the Athinoula Martinos Center of Harvard Medical School, and completed post-graduate training in bioethics at the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy of Loyola University, IL.

ANNUAL RICHARD A. MCCORMICK LECTURE
When Wednesday, April 22, 2015
Speaker Reverend Kevin Fitzgerald, S.J., Ph.D.
Topic Bringing Genomic Medicine to Patient Care: Improving our decision-making techniques and defining the ethical hurdles ahead.
Details

Kevin FitzGerald, S.J., is a Research Associate Professor in the Division of Biochemistry and Pharmacology of the Department of Oncology and the Dr. David P. Lauler Chair for Catholic Health Care Ethics. He is also a member of the Center for Clinical Bioethics, the Advisory Board for the Center for Infectious Disease (CID), and the Angiogenesis, Invasion, Metastasis Program at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

His research interests have included the investigation of abnormal gene regulation in cancer and ethical issues in human genetics, including the ethical and social ramifications of molecular genetics research. He is also a Jesuit priest and an expert on ethical issues in personalized medicine, pharmacogenomics, human cloning research, stem cell research, and genetic testing.

For information please contact Theresa M. O'Doherty at todohert@sju.edu